Sunday, 31 July 2016

Work in progress


Sunday, 17 July 2016

 
'Completely captivated by the photographic possibilities of light, both artists come at the medium with a desire to seek the extraordinary in order to access invisible states of consciousness...The essence of both their work, therefore, appears to be rooted in the personal and meditative relationship they have with metaphysical thought and less with rigid notions of representing a photographic reality. Astres Noirs gives us an insight into their supernatural vision through these fairly eclectic astral projections...Having been a follower of both Koenning and Protick for some time on Instagram, often being mesmerised by their images and regularly dumbfounded at how they might have been created, I was beautifully reminded of the very natural affinity both artists have towards a higher state of consciousness.'
 

 

Friday, 15 July 2016

'The central tone of the book is one of yearning; Astres Noirs constructs a dark and mysterious interaction between images that collectively seem to weave a meditation on existence. There’s a science fiction flavour to the images too, albeit a mature and delicate one; in Douglas Adams’s The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, a towel is said to be just about ‘the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have’; in Koenning’s photographic universe the same might be said for her mobile phone. What’s intriguing is the unique use of mobile technology as a way to see (and re-see) the world; I don’t recall any photographer using camera phones in such a way ever before, Koenning might be the first practitioner to create a style in and through Instagram... It seems Koenning has somehow accessed a different visual spectrum, accessed the full electromagnetic field of light, both visible and invisible, and also has developed an understanding of light that is beyond us mere mortals.'


Wednesday, 13 July 2016

'It really is a beautiful thing, with its opening picture of an image of a hand holding a shimmering ball of light. In Astres Noirs, the light isn’t white, it’s silver, and it really does take you into a slightly mysterious place...We’re on another planet here, one where bodies glow in ponds, where crescents of light intersect mountains and forests, one where scratched glass and grains of dust shine like stars in some distant galaxy. But this is earth and we are the aliens on its otherworldly surface. Hill slopes, feral trees, cumuli nimbus, horse manes and white doves add to this voyage of discovery.'




Lars Boering, managing director at World Press Photo, on The Crossing, Noorderlicht Festival, NL